Subscribe


Her Sermon Helps

Preaching A Memorable Sermon

Sermon NotesPreaching A Memorable Sermon
Elder Sherman Cox
www.SoulPreaching.com
 

I was talking to a lay-member the other day who was very excited about a sermon he had heard. The member gave me all four of the points of the sermon and was excited about applying the sermon to his daily life. Interestingly enough, he searched on the internet to try to find this sermon and other sermons by the same preacher. So What did the preacher do?

1. Clear Points

The first thing the preacher did was have clear and easily identifiable points. The people did not have to guess about what was important, the preacher simply told them. The preacher clearly defined the points and clearly defined what he meant by the points. We as preachers cannot expect anyone to remember our points if they do not even know what they are.

2. Points Illustrated Well

The second thing the preacher did was clearly illustrate the points with stories. Each and every main point had a story connected to it. These stories were memorable and clearly connected to the point. Sometimes we tell stories that are only tangentially related to the point. Stop doing that. It takes away from your message. However, if you have a clear point and a relevant memorable story, you are well on the way to a sermon that people will remember.

3. Each Point Stronger than Previous One

Finally, the stories of the preacher were more intense as the sermon continued. The layperson told me that each story and point was "stronger" than the other one. Please note that I am not talking about yelling to manufacture intensity, I am talking about the content being stronger. So point two was stronger than point one, and point three was stronger than point two, and point four was stronger than point three. We must leave people with the strongest content at the end, and that content should be related to the point illustrated and the main point of the sermon.

Here was an effective preacher who had content that the people remembered. And the people were ready to apply it to their daily lives. If we are to learn from this preacher, we must clearly define our points, illustrate them well with stories, and make each point progressively intense. Then the people will understand and be ready to apply the sermon.



Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/3871624
 
Author Information
Sherman Haywood Cox II is the director of SoulPreaching.ComIf you enjoyed this article, you will love his website that celebrates the Black Preaching Tradition.Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Sherman_Cox

Related Articles · More Articles
"Do you think we should use the King James version when we preach? Or does it really matter if we use something like the NIV?" Find out inside...
Preachers determine the meaning of scripture so that they can convey that meaning to the congregation in the preaching moment. Preachers go to considerable lengths to make sure that they preach the truth and not error. They study the passage within the context of the chapter, book, and even the whole cannon of scripture. In many cases, the preacher derives valid and truthful points from the text and then present those vital truths to the people. This is good, but often when you take the points from the story, you remove the ability of the people to fully experience the truth that you are presenting. But before the people can experience the text, we have to both understand and experience the text ourselves. Read more inside...
I have referred to the power that lies in the parables. They are like dynamite that can blow up at any time. We do well to tread lightly around these powerful stories that attack our complacency. Sometimes when I say things like that, preachers chalk this up to simple hyperbole. They see the parables simply as a story that illustrates various aspects of truth, like many other stories. Find out more inside...

2007-2012 BreakForth Ministries and Consulting, Inc. _PreachingWoman.com _All Rights and Content Reserved_Written Permission Required For Content Reprint or Duplication